That itching, nagging thought or idea

We all know we have that one ounce of extra something in us that could truly drive us to our personal limits. That itching, nagging thought or idea that just excites your mind, making your blood pump and your palms sweat, that idea that is going to change the world! (Imagine a guy with his white dress shirt top couple buttons unbuttoned, megaphone in hand exclaiming those last three words. That’s what I picture.)  So, why don’t more people have their success story? Why do so many people tell that itching, nagging thought or idea to just go away?

Could it be that really we’re afraid of becoming successful?  Could it be that although it is just such a great and respectable goal it would require us to change?

A new schedule.  New commute routes to learn. New contacts to create. Starting from the bottom yet again. These are scary and daunting truths about change,  at least in your career.

I bet if I asked for a show of hands in a random audience of who’s self-sabotaged an opportunity or experience because of the fear of change that the number of hands raised would far underrepresent the minds of those chewing on something they’d rather keep to themselves.

What if even one of those people could become inspired enough to take the plunge and answer that itching, nagging idea or thought? Maybe the answer to the plastic grocery bag problem? Or, perhaps the training to become the world’s happiest flight attendant and travel the world? Or even the response to a call for a theological life?

Do you have a story to share?  Was your hand raised or did you keep it to yourself? Did you listen to that itching, nagging thought or idea and have success? Or even a flop? (They say the journey is just as important as the destination.)

How To Get Your Students To Think Outside the Box – Discussion, Feedback, and Responses

The idea of thinking outside the box, the ability to see more than what the eye or experience allows, is a critical skill that requires attention in the development of our academic programs.

I presented this idea with a focus on classroom applications at the 2013 Connections Conference at the Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, IL, on March 13, 2013. This blog has been created as a means to continue to discussion.

Presentation Abstract: (click to see full profile on sched.org)

How often does the term “think outside the box” result in blank stares and silence in your classroom? Participants will acquire a variety of strategies to expand students creative and critical thinking abilities, allowing them to more easily and frequently “think outside the box.”

The presentation is available for viewing if you were unable to attend the conference: CONNECTIONS 2013 How To Get Your Students To Think Outside The Box

Please feel free to share your ideas of how to create opportunities for our students to utilize out-of-the-box thinking in the everyday classroom. I’d love to hear your feedback on the presentation as well!

I look forward to our discussions!

~ Laura Bantz